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Research Group and Members of the Community

CIHR Grant Awarded to CCHSA and UofS Researchers

Researchers from the Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (CCHSA) and University of Saskatchewan were granted by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) $1,250,775 for 5 years to “Assess, Redress, Re-assess: Addressing Disparities in Sleep Health among First Nations People”.

Congratulations!

$1,250,775 for 5 years to “Assess, Redress, Re-assess: Addressing Disparities in Sleep Health among First Nations People”.

Working with two Saskatchewan First Nations communities (Beardy’s and Okemasis Cree First Nation and Montreal Lake Cree Nation) the team proposes to better understand the relationship between health and sleep disorders so that community-based identification and treatment can occur. Methods include home sleep studies, survey tools, and actigraphy. The project addresses a likely underappreciated and important factor in community health.

This research project will look into the causes of sleep disorders in First Nations and will try to find the relationship between sleep disorders and a number of other diseases.  Also it will look into a possibility of community-based diagnosis and treatment for sleep disorders.

Based on their previous work, Dr. Dosman says that they observed the likelihood that serious sleep problems were common in the communities. Low income, poor housing, too many people in small houses, and body weight were related to sleep disorders. Poor sleep and lack of sleep may be associated with a number of diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.

Also, he says that First Nations people have been at a disadvantage for the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. Based on the previous work of Dr. Dosman’s group, there has recently been a change in policy for the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders in First Nations People. The team considers a major potential change for First Nations people in Canada. This will improve care by improving access, reducing waiting times, resulting in better treatment, and result in financial savings in transportation costs.

Results of this study will help to develop programs and impact health policy to reduce sleep disorders in First Nations people. New ideas will be formed for First Nations people everywhere.

Working with 2 First Nations communities, this research project will (a) explore relationships between sleep apnea and sleep deprivation and principal risk factors; (b) evaluate associations with comorbidities and unintentional injuries; and (c) assess feasibility of community-based diagnosis and treatment for sleep apnea.

Principal Investigators: Dr. James Arnold Dosman, Dr. Punam Pahwa, Dr. Sylvia Abonyi and Dr. Malcolm King.

Co-Investigators: Dr. M. Fenton, Dr. C. Karunanayake, Dr. S. Kirychuk, Dr. N. Koehncke, Dr. J. Lawson, Dr. D. Rennie and Dr. R. Skomro.

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